New Blood / Trey Wood

Slob 360

Slob 360

An infusion of new blood is always a good thing. Periodically, a crimson gush of nitrous pulses onto the skateboard scene and infuses it with power and might. We’ve all seen it. Go back as far as one can remember. Jay Boy, Blackhart, Steve Picciolo, TA, Steve Caballero, Scotty Foss, David Z, El Gato, Tony Hawk, Mike Frazier, Bucky Lasek, Danny Way, Alex Perelson and the list goes on… To my thinking, these skaters and others like them, changed things. They changed the way skateboarding translated. Skateboarding. Expression. An infusion of new blood. Trey Wood has come along. He oozes style, power and technicality. He isn’t afraid to go big and he always goes fast. Those are admirable qualities. I’m happy he is here. I did a quick Q&A with Trey and this was what he had to say. – Ozzie

Trey-Wood-2013-crooked-cop

BOOM

Stalefish

Stalefish

BTO- How long have you skated? Where did you start and why do you skate pools, vert and the Mega Ramp?

Trey- I’ve skated for seven years and I started in Tempe, Arizona. I skate what I do because I like to go fast and I love being in the air.

BTO- Who are your influences?

Trey- I like Pedro Barros and Bob Burnquist.

BTO- Do you have a favorite video part?

Trey- I like Jake Brown in Blind ‘What If”

Bob's Mega

Bob’s Mega

BTO- I know that you skate the Mega Ramp. Tell us about your first experience.

Trey- I was nine years old the first time and I wasn’t allowed on because it had just been built. They didn’t have any chains on it so I was able to skate the quarter pipe until the cops came. I rolled in the first time and my trucks were so loose that I got more speed wobbles than I could handle.

BTO- Do you have a favorite vert skater?

Trey- I like Jimmy Wilkins because he has an awesome style.

BTO- Who are your sponsors?

Trey- Monster Energy, Blind Skateboards, Globe Shoes, 187 Pads, Triple 8 Helmets, So Cal Skateshop,  Bones Wheels and Uncle Skate Charity.

Thank you to Trey Wood for doing this with us. Thanks to Dan Bourqui and MRZ for the images. Skate- Ozzie

 

 

 

Red Bull Skate Generation / 2014

Pedro Barros

Pedro Barros

My friend Heverton Ribeiro sent me some photographs from the backyard bonanza at Pedro’s place in Brazil. As always, it looked insane and people were really throwing it down. Here are a few for you to look at. For more, check out Cold Skateboard Magazine. Skate- Ozzie

Christian Hosoi

Christian Hosoi

Sandro Dias

Sandro Dias

crowded house

crowded house

Greyson Fletcher

Greyson Fletcher

Jeff Grosso

Jeff Grosso

Reach / Orange County

Christian Potter

Christian Potter

Ray Zimmerman drove down the 405 freeway. Our friend Christian Potter was quiet. His eyes ran over the heaving, frenetic metal business that surrounded them. Jerk-offs in fancy cars, jostling for position. Racing and weaving in and out…  only to come to a dead stop in the mid afternoon traffic jam. “They don’t have traffic like this in the UK.” He said finally. Ray laughed and admitted that they probably didn’t have traffic like this anywhere. The two talked as all skateboarders will. Tricks, lines, contests and rumor. They made their way to a secret pipe and took some turns. Christian enjoyed himself as a visitor should. The California dream has a long reach. It took its big fun arms and pulled me here many years ago. I don’t ever want to go back to where I’m from.

_DSC8089

Next stop was Etnies in Lake Forest. Nick skated with the two and good fun was found. It is hard not to have a good time at Etnies. They have a bit of everything to ride there. I met up with the two a bit later and we stopped over to see Dave Kinstrand. One look at Bible Bowl and Christian turned it up. “This is my kind of thing right here!” He flew around the bowls and pulled grinds and tricks.

MRZ

MRZ

_DSC8098

Christian

me

me

We smiled, we laughed and life was good. Thanks for the session. Thank you to MRZ for the images. Skate- Ozzie

Limits

_DSC8647

Limits. Skateboarders push themselves and others around them. It is how we progress and evolve. I have watched the Mega Ramp skaters for years now. Back in 1996, Andy Macdonald and a few of us, built a roll-in ramp into a foam pit at Woodward in Pennsylvania. It has been going on for a long time. Natural progression. The things that Bob Burnquist, Danny Way and the others are doing is pretty mind-blowing. I am fifty years old. I still fantasize about doing the loop, jumping the gap of the Mega Ramp and other such things regularly. I know my limits and abilities probably can’t fulfill such daydreams. Looking at the Mega Ramp last weekend, I said to myself, “You can’t do this thing.” First, there is the gap to contend with. Second, even if I did make it over, I still had to face the daunting challenge of doing something on the thirty foot tall quarter pipe going about forty miles per hour. I’ve only ever gone about four or five feet high on any air I’ve ever done, so the chances of making the gap and pulling an eight foot air are outside of my limits. I was watching Bob, Italo and Trey Wood. I started thinking to myself. “If I can’t make the gap, what CAN I do?” I went and grabbed my pads, some gloves and borrowed a Mega board setup from Trey Wood. I started riding down the landing ramp. I would go a bit higher each time until I was rolling in from the top. The Mega Ramp is an entirely different animal. Vert skating and pool skating cannot really prepare you.

The warm up

The warm up

All week long, I thought of the Mega Ramp. In my mind, I wanted to attempt an invert or something. I talked with MRZ and Bruno Passos. We decided to give it a try today. After a few warm up runs down the roll-in ramp, Bruno had me drop in from the top of the thirty foot quarter pipe. I put my tail out and pulled it back. Massive. It is really huge. I put my tail back out and made the plunge. I think I was in complete free-fall for two or three feet before I caught the ramp. Once I climbed up to the top of the roll in again, I still wasn’t sure if I could get the speed to do anything on the quarter pipe.

_DSC9691

There is an arched raised box on top of the Mega landing ramp that one can push off of and ollie down onto the runway. It took me a few tries to feel comfortable with it. It is like pushing off of a freeway overpass, ollieing in and down a sharply angled off ramp. It is wide, steep and fast. All of the sudden, there is a massive wall of ramp in front of you that seemingly never ends. You are weightless and you want to bail. You do or you don’t. I tried riding my vert board with hard bushings in my trucks. I cranked them tight.

Bruno Passos giving me some pointers

Bruno Passos giving me some pointers

Bruno Passos

Bruno Passos

Bruno padded up, stretched, skated and he started helping me. He told me that my vert board wouldn’t work as I wasn’t getting out of the top enough. I desperately needed more speed. I tried his Mega setup. Wide trucks. Larger wheels. Longer wheelbase. First run, I reached coping much easier. I put down a few mute airs. My heart was pounding. Bruno told me to relax a bit. Take my time. I was pretty scared. It was spooky feeling actually. It is really hard to pump the ramp. It takes more speed than you may guess. I couldn’t gather the nerve together to try an invert, so I attempted a nose pick. I soon pulled one in and over rotated. When you are falling on the Mega Ramp, you have an awful amount of time to think about it. It takes awhile before you hit… I bailed the next two and over rotated one again. I was coming in at an angle and I couldn’t turn out of it. The trucks don’t turn.  At this point, I knew that I had to make it. I made the long walk up again. I was tired and getting sore. Brian Fick, Leo and Bruno told me to handle it. “You got it dude.” Next one up, it went down.

_DSC8727

Exhilaration.   Of course, I didn’t do the gap. I didn’t do a Mega Ramp sized trick. However, I did push my personal limits. I wouldn’t take council of my fear and doubts. I’m stoked. Progression. Thanks to Bob Burnquist, MRZ, Bruno Passos, Leo Ruiz and Brian Fick for the motivation and help. Skate- Ozzie

New Blood / Max Jenson

unnamed-1
MAX JENSON
BTO- Where are you from?
Max- I’m from North Hampton, New Hampshire aka “The frozen tundra”
BTO- How long have you been skating and what is your favorite thing to ride?
Max- I have been skating since the age of five.  I skate vert and bowls because I love the feeling of grinding super fast and blasting big airs and spins.  Transition skating  feels very similar to halfpipe snowboarding and I’ve spent the last eight years chasing both sports.
lien

lien

BTO- Who are your influences?
Max- I’ve been influenced from my past snowboarding career and several Pros and Masters in skateboarding.  I think Chris Miller, Steve Caballero, Christian Hosoi are true rippers.  They have great style and flow while they skate.  Personally I try to mix their style with some of the pros.  I think Bucky Lasek, Alex Perelson and Pedro Barros have absolutely amazing tricks.  I’ve decided to focus my free time skateboading these days but hope that my experience in two sports will develop into a unique skating style.
BTO- Who are your sponsors?
Max- Vans, 187 killer pads and Pioneers Board Shop.
BTO_ What are your favorite tricks?
Max- Frontside Lien airs, Frontside Varials and Mute 540′s
Max- FS Bluntslide- Combi

Max- FS Bluntslide- Combi

Thanks to Max Jenson for taking the time to speak with us. Thanks to Lorrie Palmos, Dan Bourqui and Paxton for the images. Skate- Ozzie

 

Memory

Alva inerview cover 2-77

Our perception of things. It can change. Sometimes dramatically. I returned to the place where I lived after being gone for many years. The town was smaller than I recalled. Life was defined by my fading memories. Things were remembered differently. I guess it can be a matter of the importance attached to such things. Something super special might manifest much more magnificently in one’s memory. Strange. I was going through the William Sharp archive and I came across an image of Tony Alva from the Canton pool.

TA and Craig Stecyk - Canton pool

William Sharp’s – TA and Craig Stecyk photograph – Canton pool

I was reminded of the Tony Alva interview in Skateboarder Magazine of February 1977. Craig Stecyk had photographed TA in the Canton pool. In the William Sharp photograph, I can see Craig Stecyk looking through the viewfinder of his camera on the deck. He’s taking a photograph of TA balancing at the top of Canton’s side wall. I remembered the Stecyk shot from the Skateboarder interview and put the two things together. I had stumbled across something pretty cool. William Sharp had shot a photograph of Craig Stecyk shooting a photograph of Tony Alva during the Canton pool session for TA’s first Skateboarder interview in 1977. Epic. I looked around and found the Stecyk shot. I compared them. Both shots were taken at almost the exact same moment.

Craig Stecyk's TA Skateboarder interview photograph

Craig Stecyk’s TA Skateboarder interview photograph

I decided to check with those involved. Kent Senatore had found the Canton pool. It was right near his dad’s house. He said,  “Canton was the first permission pool I ever had and it was the first pool where I went over the light and eventually would get one wheelers.” Kent said that on the day these photographs were taken, he saw TA doing ‘forevers’ in Canton pool. He went the next day and learned back-to-back frontside and backside kickturns. I asked William Sharp about the photograph. He said that TA showed up with a photographer who was introduced as, “…this is so and so.” The photographer was quiet and shot photographs of Tony and afterward they left.

unnamed-4

When TA’s Skateboarder interview came out, the Sharp brothers realized that the photographer was Craig Stecyk. They had not previously met him so they didn’t know what he looked like! When asked, Craig Stecyk told me, “I think I gave the Sharp brothers a roll of film that day. Being drunk enough then, I cannot remember now.” William Sharp stated that he didn’t recall getting any film from Stecyk. He didn’t really even speak to them. Memories. All in all, it is extraordinary. The photographs are historical. A slice of life… now gone. Yet they can live on in our collective memory. We have the fragmented stories of those involved. Pool sessions blending together. Hot summer days melting into the next. Decades drifting by…  Thank you to William Sharp, Craig Stecyk and Kent Senatore for their recollections. Skate- Ozzie

Reach / Pools

Christian Potter - Gorilla Pool

Christian Potter – Gorilla Pool

When Christian was visiting from England, we drove the grid. One of the things he talked about, was the lack of pools where he is from. It really is a southern California, Arizona, southwest thing. If we are speaking of pool abundance, this is where they are in numbers. He wanted to drive the grid and see how we do exactly what we do.

_MG_5912

 

indeed

indeed

IMG_5925

The second day that he was here, it rained a bit. Perfect morning for a drive. I loaded up the buckets and everything. I wanted him to earn it. We stopped at the Gorilla pool and bucketed this permission pool so that we might skate it later on. There was quite a bit of rainwater in it. He thought that it looked impossibly steep. I informed him that he was looking at it incorrectly. We don’t really ride straight up and down a pool wall. You carve up and across it. This makes the transitions much larger and usually easier to get to the top.

uhmm...

uhmm…

 

John Torchia

John Torchia – Gorilla Pool

Shane Allen

Shane Allen- Gorilla Pool

We drove the grid. We found a pool or two. Junk mostly. It was interesting for Christian. Friends stopped by later and we had a backyard pool day. Experience. Roots. The basis of all things radical.. Good friends. Good times. Thank you to William Sharp for the images. Skate- Ozzie

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Reply