Skateboarding Hall Of Fame

SHofTrophys

I must preface this article with a few words. First of all, this is MY opinion. I started skateboarding in 1973. I’ve never been pro, I’ve never been sponsored, I’ve never been anything and I’ve never quit. I have received boards, trucks, wheels, shoes and clothing over the years and I am eternally grateful for the flow. I entered an amateur vert contest series in the early 90’s. I ended up 3rd Overall and have a trophy somewhere. I’ve only ever been able to do about fifteen tricks in my entire life. I ran Woodward and it can be argued that I didn’t do that very well sometimes. I’ve been a mess and I’ve been in my own way on countless occasions. Yet, I am the truth. This is my voice. How far can it reach? I wonder…

skateboarding_hall_of_fame

I have seen the Skateboarding Hall Of Fame inductees for this year. Gregg Carroll, Jim Muir, Steve Olson, Lance Mountain, Natas Kaupas, Laurie Turner and Ellen O’Neal. I wondered about the criteria involved. I thought about it on the drive home after the first Hall Of Fame when Tony Alva, Tony Hawk, Danny Way and Bruce Logan were inducted on the floor of the Vans Skatepark in 2009.

CCS_3474-1

Some inductees are a ‘no-brainer’. At least, I would think. Skateboarding isn’t very old. I have done a bit of research into the whole thing and this is basically what I think the deal is. We currently have a committee of several knowledgable skateboarders and industry main-stays. I know almost all of them. I trust that their hearts are pure. They have compiled a list of just about anyone that has ever been in the magazines, contests and involved in skateboarding as an Am or a Pro. I believe that there has been a long list of criteria written out that enables the committee to evaluate whether a person makes it into the Hall Of Fame that particular year. Contest placing, influence, coverage, longevity and what the particular person gives back to skateboarding are all considerations. It should be this way. Then there is a voting group of about five hundred industry main-stays, past Pro’s and Am’s that are sent the list of those nominated. These five hundred vote on that list.  One of the things that struck me after the first Hall Of Fame was this: there are 1960’s era skaters but there are actually two or three separate 1970’s era skateboarders. It could be argued for example that Greg Weaver was a huge influence for a short two or three year span in the 1970’s before he disappeared completely from skateboarding. Duane Peters is a 1970’s era skater. Duane never quit skateboarding, was inventive and as gnarly as they come… for decades. Does Greg Weaver go into the Hall Of Fame before Duane? They aren’t quite at the same level in influence, style or longevity. These are the things I think about. Questions.

Jim Muir

Jim Muir

Steve Olson

Steve Olson

Lance Mountain

Lance Mountain

Ellen O'Neal

Ellen O’Neal

It must be a tremendously difficult and thankless task. I think that they are onto something. They’ve been inducting several skateboarders from the early generations and era’s. This will enable the Hall Of Fame to get some very deserving skaters in much faster. After all, we are all growing older. We lost Waldo Autry, Baby Paul, Polar Bear Agnew, Bob Biniak…  the list goes on.  I think that the Hall Of Fame people are trying to do a positive and inspiring thing. I am glad to be seeing it happen in my time. Do you think that I want to see, Kent Senatore, Jerry Valdez, Shreddi Repas, Brad Bowman, Doug DeMontmorency, Dave Hackett, Henry Hester, Arnie Hauge, Tim Marting, Arthur Viecco, Lonnie Toft, Jeff Phillips (R.I.P.), Gunnar Haugo, Gregg Ayres, Steve and Micke Alba, Steve Picciolo (R.I.P.), Moses Padilla, Wes Humpston, Jim Cassimus, Jim Goodrich, Stan and Bill Sharp, Ted Terrebonne, George Orton, Kevin Worm Anderson, Scott Foss, Jay Smith, Shogo Kubo, Wally Inouye, Pineapple, Dennis Martinez, Bert Lamar, Billy Ruff, Tex Gibson, Tom Groholski, Gator, the Altieri brothers, Bobby Valdez, Darrel Miller, Rod Saunders, Art Dickey, Chris Strople, Tay Hunt, Doug Schneider, Curt Cortum, Steve Hirsch, Eddie Elguera, Jim Sigurdson, Jeff Tatum, Scott Dunlap, Rick Blackhart, Paul Constantineau, Mike Weed, Mark Lake, Kevin Reed, Mike Folmer, Skitch Hitchcock, Bob Mohr, Alan Losi, Pat Ngoho, Dave Andrecht, Eric Grisham, Robin Logan, Vicki Vickers, Peter Kiwi Gifford, David Z, Jami Godfrey, Kirk Talbott, Eric Halverson, Brenda Devine, Howard Hood, Lonnie Hiramoto, Marc Hollander, Darren Ho, Deanno Mueller, Kelly Lynn, Shawn Peddie (R.I.P.), John Warneke, Ray Flores, Eric Dressen, Dave Ferry, Marc Smith, the Godoy’s, Jeff Grosso, Neil Blender, Eric Nash, Tony Magnussen, Billy Yeron, Ray Bones Rodriguez, Jimmy Plummer, Chris Miller, Jimmy Murphy, Fred Smith, Dave Duncan, Curt Kimbel, Jeff Kendall, Jason Jesse, Lester Kasai, Adrian Demain, Kim Cespedes, Steve Cathey and many, many more…  do you think I want to see them in the Hall Of Fame?!  Absolutely. Every molecule that makes up my body longs for such a thing. After all, when all is said and done, they and those that came before, are all in the Hall Of Fame as far as I am concerned.

Hall Of Fame 2013

Hall Of Fame 2013

Laura Thornhill 2013 HOF

Laura Thornhill 2013 HOF

I asked David Hackett about the Hall Of Fame and he answered directly.  “Eventually everyone will be inducted. To be fair, there is a criteria of not only what skateboarding did for you: fame, money, esteem, but more importantly, what you gave back. Moves, tricks invented, brands, designs that helped revolutionize the art form and lastly, how many other skaters did you help or give back to over the course of a lifetime in the game? There are those riders who were great for the ‘Boom’ years and then quit for twenty or thirty years. Some have started started skating again and this is awesome, but they probably won’t receive the same weight of votes of a 100% Skateboarder for Life.”

This process will take time and it is evolving as we go. Changes are being made each year. It is becoming better and better. Big things have small beginnings. Perhaps those who are candidates for the Hall Of Fame, (past Pro and Am skaters) should provide current email and contact information to the committee and become involved in the voting process. Everyone will then be a part of the solution which will only enable the Skateboarding Hall Of Fame to continue to grow and be the special thing that it is.

Thank you to Glen E. Friedman, Lucia Griggi and Jim Goodrich for the images. Skate- Ozzie

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12 thoughts on “Skateboarding Hall Of Fame

  1. I nominate you- for holding the skateboarding world together by using your gift of writing! You are; Tireless, fervent, constant, deep, moving.. thought provoking…! You write with passion and sincere love for the sport and the people involved now and before. I am a huge fan. Keep it coming!

  2. Don’t really give a shit about this HOF Skateboarding, Academy Award nonsense…But your post caught my attention! If u lived it, u already know the history & respect all of it! Skateboarding is & always will be an ART FORM! Why are you even talking about this HOF nonsense? Sounding a little jockish!!!! Sorry blogger!!! Duane Peters before Gregg Weaver? Really? I’m confused? It’s Gregg Weaver! First cover of Skateboarder Mag skating a pool barefoot, one of the first Cadillac Wheels sponsored skaters-hence the nickname “the Cadillac Kid”, early frontside flyaway, frontside lipslide innovator…sorry, but history is about pioneers of skating, no matter how long they skated! Could care less if some 50 something guy is still skating, still trying to capitalize off skating, after all these years & is still doing the same shit, he did in the 70’s! Fuck the rock star hype!!!

  3. ”Eventually everyone will be inducted. To be fair, there is a criteria of not only what skateboarding did for you: fame, money, esteem, but more importantly, what you gave back. Moves, tricks invented, brands, designs that helped revolutionize the art form and lastly, how many other skaters did you help or give back to over the course of a lifetime in the game? There are those riders who were great for the ‘Boom’ years and then quit for twenty or thirty years. Some have started skating again and this is awesome, but they probably won’t receive the same weight of votes of a 100% Skateboarder for Life.”- David Hackett
    Love you Brother, but spoken like a true tyrant whose agenda meets the criteria that isolates the nameless guys killing it in backyards pools Worldwide, who will only be remembered by their friends who were there to witness the high energy that we all possess. No one has the patent on the freedom that skateboarding provides. So find another vehicle to cash in on. Nice try BROHAM.
    The JER

  4. Well said Ozzie. So many rippers past and present. How do you pick and who deserves it? Dudes who rode and faded and those that never stopped. Hard call… I think they should all be recognized at some point for their contributions to sk8boarding. For all of us who were entranced by the photos and inspired by the guys in the mags, the SHOF doesn’t really matter. Who they were/are and their influence will never be forgotten, but I think we should give a shout out to all the ones who did it strictly for the love of it and never quit. We all know that for every sk8er that got coverage in the mags, there were many more nameless guys killing it in a backyard somewhere who will only be remembered by their friends in the shallow end… Much respect to all the nominees and thanks for the great memories!

  5. I wonder if there will ever be a time when a non US citizen will be nominated for the Skateboarding Hall of Fame……….if that ever happens…there are numerous worth a consideration, I am sure about that. Just my thoughts..
    Chris, Greets from Germany

    • Not ur ‘mate’. The lifestyle of skateboarding involves independent thinking. Those originals who influenced generations should b acknowledged. Look around u. Vision street wear fashion is gone. There’s a reason todays skaters are the way they are. Haven’t seen u in any mags lately… Or ever.

  6. some are no brainers…the rest is a bukkake party keeping it in the family. we bridged the gap between tattoo n skate. how many pros today r tattooed…this style has hung around longer than any other. the 80’s generation fashion disappeared like a blip…godoys r tattoo skate punk legends.

    • Tattoo’s came late into the picture.
      I was there early, before the show, and was a lone, tatted skater with a mere few others, until eventually the Godoy’s and gradually more came of age, and began their interests in the mid-to0-late ’80s, before it came out of obscurity, and became the trendy mall-tatt-fashion it is now, with skin-skribblers every other block of every city [yawnnnnn]. Sorry, tatt’s are far down the list of importance, many levels beyond ‘secondary’ in the the essence of skateboarding, attitude, talent, charisma, and style but a few being much more important. Tatt’s are merely permanant stickers, and shouldn’t even be part of the SHOF topic.

      I find it noteworthy that the rarely mentioned Kent Senatore heads off the long list —[as extensive as it is, still misses huge gaps of OG karakters of undisputed importance, i.e., people like Fausto and the NorCals, who pulled skating out of the shitter as it circled the drain in the late ’70s, and re-invented the industry, and propelling it into it’s present course.]. I look forward to hearing the tales and legends of Kent’s path from the old days to the present, as a fucking lone skate samurai.

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